US Census Warning From Better Business Bureau

  • Comments: 3
  • Written on: August 20th, 2009

One of my readers forwarded me a report from the Better Business Bureau.  The US Census is taking place this year, and the government is hiring thousands of temporary workers to help get the job done.

Unfortunately, the Census also provides a ripe opportunity for identity thieves to knock on your door, ask you personal questions, and use the U.S. Government’s name to compel you to answer.  Here is the waring from the BBB:

BBB Alerts Consumers about U.S. Census Workers:
Be Cooperative, But Cautious!

For years, Better Business Bureau has educated consumers about not giving out personal information over the telephone or to anyone who shows up at their front door. With the U.S. Census process beginning, BBB advises people to be cooperative, but cautious, so as not to become a victim of fraud or identity theft.

The first phase of the 2010 U.S. Census is under way as workers have begun verifying the addresses of households across the country. Eventually,more than 140,000 U.S. Census workers will count every person in the United States and will gather information about every person living at each address including name, age, gender, race and other relevant data.

“Most people are rightfully cautious and won’t give out personal information to unsolicited phone callers or visitors, however the Census is an exception to the rule,” said Steve Cox, BBB spokesperson.

“Unfortunately, scammers know that the public is more willing to share personal data when taking part in the Census and they have an opportunity to ply their trade by posing as a government employee and soliciting sensitive financial information.”

The Census data will be used to allocate more than $300 billion in federal funds every year, as well as determine a State’s number of Congressional representatives. Households are required by law to respond to the Census Bureau’s request for information.

During the U.S. Census, households will be contacted by mail, telephone or visited by a U.S. Census worker who will inquire about the number of people living in the house. Unfortunately, people may also be contacted by scammers who are impersonating Census workers in order to gain access to sensitive financial information such as Social Security, bank account or credit card numbers.

Law enforcement in several states have issued warnings that scammers are already posing as Census Bureau employees and knocking on doors asking for donations and Social Security numbers.
Question is – how do you tell the difference between a U.S. Census worker and a con artist? BBB offers the following advice:

If a U.S. Census worker knocks on your door, they will have a badge, a handheld device, a Census Bureau canvas bag and a confidentiality notice.

Ask to see their identification and their badge before answering their questions. However, you should never invite anyone you don’t know into your home.

Census workers are currently only knocking on doors to verify address information. Do not give your Social Security number, credit card or banking information to anyone, even if they claim they need it for the U.S. Census.

While the Census Bureau might ask for basic financial information, such as a salary range, it will not ask for Social Security, bank account or credit card numbers nor will employees solicit donations.

Eventually, Census workers may contact you by telephone, mail or in person at home.

However, they will not contact you by e-mail, so be on the look out for e-mail scams impersonating the Census.

Never click on a link or open any attachments in an e-mail that are supposedly from the U.S. Census Bureau.

  1. Michael
    Michael said on August 22nd, 2009 at 1:05 pm

    Does anyone know why the Census needs to know how much my mortgage payment is? And the one that really irritates me more is the 5th question regarding Latino, hispanic, or spanish origin. Why, all of a sudden do all government nosy foms want to know these two.. I’m really questioning this year wether I’m filling it out.

  2. John said on August 25th, 2009 at 8:51 pm

    Seems like the more power the government assumes, the more incentive scammers have to appropriate that power for their own uses. As we’ve gotten used to police flaunting their power, we’ve also seen a rise in police impersonations. Now, even the census is nosy enough to attract scammers? Yeah, the whole political situation is a little bit nutty these days and more power for power’s sake seems to complicate it further.

  3. Pdf search said on September 4th, 2009 at 1:52 am

    how do you tell the difference between a U.S. Census worker and a con artist?

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